Finding God, self, and community in wild spaces. The better we know our wild neighbors the more we'll discover ourselves.
A vision informed by Henry David Thoreau’s interpretation of sauntering, Jesus’ understanding of neighbor, Aldo Leopold’s concept of thinking like a mountain, Rachel Carson’s prophetic voice and John Muir’s way of capturing the beauty and uniqueness of wild neighbors with words.

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Good dirt

Today was a good day for Erin and I to do the prep work for our front yard garden. We took a few hours to work the soil, removing rocks and adding leaf mulch from our back yard compost pile to make for some very good dirt.

As Erin spread the leaf mulch and I tilled the soil I got to reflecting on some words in chapter 13 of the Gospel according to Matthew that are attributed to Jesus:

"A farmer went out to plant some seeds. As he scattered them across his field, some seeds fell on a footpath, and the birds came and ate them. Other seeds fell on shallow soil with underlying rock. The seeds sprouted quickly because the soil was shallow. But the plants soon wilted under the hot sun, and since they didn’t have deep roots, they died. Other seeds fell among thorns that grew up and choked out the tender plants. Still other seeds fell on fertile soil, and they produced a crop that was thirty, sixty, and even a hundred times as much as had been planted! Anyone with ears to hear should listen and understand.”

When the Spirit of God plants seeds of faith, hope, and love on the garden of my heart, I want fertile soil to be found there; so I will take time to work the soil in garden of my heart through regular acts of worship; thanking God, opening my heart to being changed by God, and loving God through my service to others.

"Change the desires of my heart, loving God, so that it beats in tune with yours, and may the change you're bringing about within me find expression in my living. Let every seed of faith, hope, and love that's planted in my heart find fertile soil to produce more faith, more hope, and more love."



 (Some volunteers from last year popping up before we even prepared the soil...dill and lettuce)



 (pine and maple trees in the back yard drop eventually their leaves, which are added to our compost pile)


 (Here in our compost pile the leaves and needles decompose into new soil)


(The soil from our compost pile in the mostly shaded back yard is transported to our sunny front yard garden via wheel barrel)



(Then its time to till the soil, mixing the leaf mulch into last year's soil to make for some REALLY GOOD DIRT!)


(Lots of small insects in the freshly prepared dirt...including ants, worms, flies, sowbugs, etc. is a sign that there's lots of good plant nourishing nutrients in this garden plot...planting soon to come!)






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