Finding God, self, and community in wild spaces. The better we know our wild neighbors the more we'll discover ourselves.
A vision informed by Henry David Thoreau’s interpretation of sauntering, Jesus’ understanding of neighbor, Aldo Leopold’s concept of thinking like a mountain, Rachel Carson’s prophetic voice and John Muir’s way of capturing the beauty and uniqueness of wild neighbors with words.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Like Boats on the Water

The sky above is filled with thick clouds as a cold wind sweeps over the marsh on this unseasonably chilly day in mid-May, but there is some activity even among a few of the smallest of living things that call this place home. First one mayfly is seen resting with legs upheld by the surface tension of the water; then a second floats right alongside the first. Like sailboats navigating a Great Lake, their transparent wings act like sails as together these insect neighbors are pushed about by the current of a gentle breeze.

It is encouraging to see mayflies present at the Sheer Road Swamp because these beautiful insects are one among many indicators of good water quality and a healthy environment. Many species of mayflies are detrivores, which means they consume decaying organic matter that falls into the swamp, therefore providing a valuable service to the swamp in the decomposition of wood and leaves into soil.

They are our neighbors in this diverse community of life; good, beautiful, loved by God, and a member of  the universe’s great symphony of unending praise as all things praise God by being our authentic selves. I am thankful for the mayfly who is worthy of the respect, care, and love that is required of us for our neighbors.





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