Finding God, self, and community in wild spaces. The better we know our wild neighbors the more we'll discover ourselves.
A vision informed by Henry David Thoreau’s interpretation of sauntering, Jesus’ understanding of neighbor, Aldo Leopold’s concept of thinking like a mountain, Rachel Carson’s prophetic voice and John Muir’s way of capturing the beauty and uniqueness of wild neighbors with words.

Saturday, June 8, 2019

On the road again

I’m sure you’ve seen those signs along the roadway that say “slow down, save a life.” What if we understood that message to be not just about protecting human life but rather, protecting all of he living things that might show up along the roadway?

The fact is that one of the most significant elements of habitat loss for many animals is the habitat fragmentation that results from the construction of roads.  As strange as this sounds, imagine if a two lane highway was built between the living room and the dining room of your home? You’d take special measures to protect your family from the danger posed by oncoming vehicles for the dangerous trek from the living room couch to the dinner table, right?

This is the reality faced by wildlife in many wild spaces today.

When asked, Jesus said that the most important thing is to “love God with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength, and to love our neighbor as ourselves.”

If we are to expand the bounds of who we count as a neighbor beyond the scope of human life to include turtles, deer and other wildlife along the roadway then we owe it to them to slow down, keep watch, and exercise patience in helping them to safely cross the road as we are able.

Let us consider our neighbors. In Jesus’ name, slow down, save a life.






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